Year: 2012

Tobias Bradford

In recognition of his work as a Public Affairs Officer at the U.S. Embassy in Mozambique and, in particular, of his unusually innovative programming targeting youth, including a “student achievers program” that created local student networks engaging with topics such as entrepreneurship, civic participation and political party development.

Sozopol Fiction Seminar, 2012

Fellows: Philip Anastassiu, Garrard Conley, Nikolay Fenerski, Kathy Flann, Garth Greenwell, Delaney Nolan, Nikolay Petkov, Palmi Ranchev, Cab Tran, Bistra Velichkova

Chris Miner

In recognition of her career-long achievements in cultural diplomacy, including her efforts in support of the high-profile US-Russia Bilateral Presidential Commission.

Dick Davis

For his translation of Vis and Ramin, an ancient Persian epic composed by the poet Fakhraddin Gorgani. The Prize was announced by AIIS President Franklin Lewis in August 2012 at a conference of the International Society of Iranian Studies in Istanbul. No winner has been announced yet for 2013. Davis is Chair of of Near …

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Aglika Markova

For her translation into Bulgarian of Life According to Lubka, by Laurie Graham.

Iglika Vassileva

For her translations of Diary of A Bad Year, by J.M. Coetzee, and Homer & Langley, by E.L. Doctorow.

Arkadi Klioutchanski & John Woodsworth

Joint award, with Arkadi Klioutchanski, for their translation of My Life, the autobiography of Sofia Andreevna Tolstaya, Leo Tolstoy’s wife of over fifty years. Woodworth is at the University of Ottawa.

Pierre Demarty

For his translation into French of Paul Harding’s Tinkers (French title, Les Foudroy√©s). This second Coindreau prize in our 2012 program year reflects the shift of the annual award ceremony in Paris from December to June.

Jacques Mailhos

For his translation into French of environmentalist Edward Abbey’s non-fiction work, Desert Solitaire.

Margit Bowler

Project on linguistic quantifiers in Warlpiri, an aboriginal language spoken by 3,000 people in Australia’s Northern Territories. Bowler’s Roth Foundation award helped defray the costs of field work and data collection. She is a graduate of Reed College.

William Banks

Project: The selection, editing and translation of early 20th-century works by Georg Brandes, an influential Danish scholar and critic who wrote on national minorities, stateless people and the colonized. Banks is at the University of Wisconsin.

Philip Robinson

Project on architectural means to improve concert hall design, conducted at Aalto University. Robinson’s Roth Ednowment award enabled him to travel to undertake research into the acoustical properties of historic Finnish churches. He is at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.

Amanda Tasse

Project in neuro-cinematics, the study of perceptual processes in response to cinema. Tasse’s Roth Foundation award enabled her to travel to the University of Lapland and the Midnight Sun Film Festival for her research. She is at the University of Southern California.

Alex Latu

Studies in administrative and constitutional law, towards earning a Master of Law degree at New York University Law School. Latu is interested in developing new legal structures to use in awarding and evaluating government contracts with private entities.

Katherine Edelen

Project on the relationship between environmental factors and social conflicts, undertaken at Norway’s Peace Research Institute in Oslo. Prior to going to Norway, Edelen had spent a year as an intern with the White House Task Force on Climate Change and Energy. Her Roth Foundation award enabled her to extend her data collection on water …

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Elisa Maria Lopez

Project on the sociocultural impacts of renewable energy development among the Sami people, for a dissertation in anthropology at Columbia University.

Michelle Anne Urberg

Project entitled “Hystorie in Medieval Sweden: Musical Devotion, Nationalism and Brigittine Monasticism,” for a dissertation in musicology at the University of Chicago.

Thomas Pickering

Distinguished American senior statesman Ambassador Pickering spoke on the future of U.S. Middle East diplomacy at Pembroke College Oxford, Kings College London and Edinburgh University, in a talk entitled “From the Pillars of Hercules to the Hindu Kush.”